Friday, December 14, 2012

Copper Quarter, Acid Wash

Do you have a quarter and want to know its value? Leave a comment

At first I thought this one was damaged, then I thought it was an error, and now I am sure it was corroded by some type of acid. It could have been water but with a high pH since it still can cause this type of damage. I show this because many people find copper quarters and think it is some type of error.


The first thing I always advise is to weigh it. That is generally good advice but if the coin is acid washed then it will weigh less. A normal quarter weighs 5.67 grams but this "copper" quarter weighs 5.32 grams. Since nickel makes up 8.33% then any quarter missing both clad layers would weigh less than 5.20 grams. That is a good guess although variants exist.

This one also has other clues that is not a true error. For one thing it is not sharp. All the details are obscured and fuzzy. Even being old it would have greater detail if struck on copper. Second it is very dented and scratched which could be an attempt to clean it. Third is that the rim still shows hints of the silver colored copper-nickel clad layer.

Errors are very cool but sometimes an obvious damaged coin is just that. Even if it was an error most of the value is gone due to the terrible condition.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 25 Cents / United States
Year: 1965
Mintage: 1,819,717,540
Metal: 91.67% Copper 8.33% Nickel
Value: $0.25 because it is a quarter

I doubt this would make it through any vending machine but I will not test that theory.

Do you have a quarter from America and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

6 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

Anonymous said...

I am 100% sure this was metal detected. Clad quarters corrode in the ground, and turn red. Put it under vinegar and salt; if the coin turns dark gray, it is metal detected, if not, then it is something else. This could take up to a week.

Man said...

100% sure this was metal detected. Clad quarters corrode in the ground, and turn red. Put it under vinegar and salt; if the coin turns dark gray, it is metal detected, if not, then it is something else. This could take up to a week.

Possibly, that would be an interesting experiment. I could see the scratches and scrapes as an attempt to clear dirt.

TheUnwantedSaved said...

Environmental Damage, It's been in the ground and dug up. I dig these up all the time with my metal detector. All you have to do is put it in Vinegar and a lot of salt. Then after a few hours to a day, wash and rub damp baking soda as a paste on the coin. Then the coin wll be ready to spend. And escape the fiery flames at the mint.

Man said...

Environmental Damage, It's been in the ground and dug up. I dig these up all the time with my metal detector. All you have to do is put it in Vinegar and a lot of salt. Then after a few hours to a day, wash and rub damp baking soda as a paste on the coin. Then the coin wll be ready to spend. And escape the fiery flames at the mint.

Agreed. Still I got this in my change so spending is not a problem.

Thanks maybe next time I will give it a vinegar bath.

Anonymous said...

Did you ever clean it up?

Man said...

Did you ever clean it up?

No, even with obvious damage I tend not to clean coins.