Wednesday, September 17, 2014

1970-S Nickel

My coin collecting rule is usually just anything that is odd, 50+ year old, non-U.S., or brand new. This is an exception because it has an S mint mark for San Francisco. True it is still common but I see S mint marks the least among all coins so I choose to keep any I find.

This was the last S mint marked nickel issued for circulation. Over 238 million were made so they will never likely be worth more than metal value in circulated condition.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 5 Cents / United States
Year: 1970-S
Mintage: 238,832,004
Metal: 75% Copper 25% Nickel
Value: $0.10 in F-12

Do you have a nickel and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

2014-D Lincoln Shield Cent

This seems to be the most common U.S. coin for 2014 yet it took over 8 months to find one in my change. The Denver mint serves California so they pump out coins at a higher rate. While NYC is a tourist trap most of them are not from the west so finding any D coin in my change takes time.

Except for the long wait to find one this coin is not special or rare. I actually found two of them around the same time.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 1 Cent  / United States
Year: 2014-D
Mintage: 2,942,400,000 (estimated so far)
Metal: 97.5% Zinc, 2.5% Copper
Value: $0.01 in EF-40

Do you have a cent and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

Monday, September 15, 2014

1982 Switzerland 5 Rappen

The second most common 5 Rappen is this one from 1982. Still it is nice to get an 30+ year older foreign coin in my change. This is the first 5 rappen I found in the wild and probably only got it because it was from a take a penny, leave a penny tray.

This one has a fruited wreath, I think grapes, with the value in the center. The front has the typical Confederatio Helvetica which basically means the Swiss Confederation. It also has what looks loke Liberty wearing a LIBERTY head band.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 5 Rappen / Switzerland
Year: 1982
Mintage: 75,340,000
Metal: Aluminum-Bronze
Value: $0.10 in XF

Do you have a coin from Switzerland and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

1985 Switzerland 20 Rappen

Found two Swiss coins in a find a penny leave a penny tray. 20 rappen coins are nickel sized and are the easiest Swiss coin to find in my change.

The floral wreath is on the 20 rappen coin and each coin has a different type of wreath. 

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 20 Rappen / Switzerland
Year: 1985
Mintage: 40,027,000
Metal: Copper-Nickel
Value: $0.40 in Extra-Fine

Do you have a coin from Switzerland and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

2002-A Germany 10 Euro Cent

Still finding a steady stream of German euro coins. Although I have seen more Brazilian tourists than German ones the Germans are more likely to use their coins for change.

Watching how tourist use money is very odd. A lot of them keep travel wallets strapped inside their underwear. In summer and winter that means soggy sweaty notes. Brazilians and Europeans do this the most. Asian and Arabic tourist use normal wallets but tend to throw money around like it was worthless.

One thing most tourist have in common is a dislike for coins. I have seen them refuse change even in large amounts. The American nickel and dime seems to confuse them the most. Since nickels are larger than dimes they often think they are worth more. Accidentally or purposefully using their native coins happens more often among Canadians and Europeans, seldom it happens with Arabic countries.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 10 Euro Cent / Germany
Year: 2002-A
Mintage: 696,240,000
Metal: Brass
Value: $0.15 in Very-Fine

Do you have a Euro coin and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

Friday, September 12, 2014

1973 British New Penny

Well New at the time. The term new was used from 1971 to 1981 in order to let the British public know that there was a new monetary system in use. 1971 marked the first year used the decimal system that replaced a confusing pre-decimal coinage.

Most countries have changed monetary systems in some way in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. The attitudes of the public were hesitant but accepting. Now in America it would be a protest filled debate that would drag on.

As time moves on coins and currency need updating for many reasons it is just the way of things. Bracing the public by using the term new is a good way. Changing a coin's size or metal is normal but refusing to see that money as real or calling it fiat is just paranoid delusion.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 1 New Penny / Great Britain
Year: 1973
Mintage: 280,196,000
Metal: Bronze
Value: $0.10 in VF (very-fine)

Do you have a coin from Great Britain and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.