Wednesday, October 31, 2012

1943 Tombac Canada Nickel with or without Gold

Have Canadian nickel and want to know its value? Leave a comment

War nickels were made out of Tombac, a combination of copper and zinc, because the nickel in nickels had to be reallocated for steel in war materials. They lasted only for two years in 1942 and 1943, a 1944 Tombac found is unique, but the copper was need so they changed composition again in 1944. Still these coins are common and 1943 is the most common with over 24 million minted.


The V (5 in Roman numbers) on the reverse  was inspired by the "V" Churchill through up during the World War II and by the older U.S. 1883-1912 nickels that had V symbol. The torch is known as a vitory torch seen around the western world for many reason. The front has GEORGIVS VI D : G : REX ET IND : IMP : with a protrait of King George VI.

Secret code
Look on the reverse the border near the rim is a Morse code message, "We win when working willingly."


This one was plated in gold but not by the Canadian government. Plating coins is considered damage by collectors since the surface of the coin is permanently altered.As for the silver, gold, or platinum used in  coin plating they have little to no value. The reason is that it is usually low quality and also very thinly layered. As you see above the gold is so thin after a few years it begins flaking or scraping off. As far as I know there is no efficient way to salvage this gold.


Side by side you can see the difference but I prefer the way the original Tombac looks. Although the luster is gone a high grade Tombac coin looks more like the plated version except a bit less yellow.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 5 Cents / Canada
Year: 1943
Mintage: 24,760,256
Metal: 88% Copper, 12% Zinc
Value: $0.30 in Very-Fine

Do you have a coin from Canada and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

2 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

Anonymous said...

I don't mean any disrespect, but I believe you're wrong about that coin being plated. From what I know, tombac is originally a gold color, but tarnishes quickly to more of a brown. A quick google search for high grade tombac Canadian nickels will show that they're mostly a golden color.

Man said...

I don't mean any disrespect, but I believe you're wrong about that coin being plated.

Your opinion is valid.

The problem is the color is yellow-gold not light copper which the real one would be.

Also if you are very careful you can peel the gold off at certain spots. That means it is 2 different metals.

Maybe the picture do not show it well but it is an obvious plating. Still I will keep the possibility it is not plated in mind.