Sunday, September 09, 2012

Coined For Money: Round-Up Sept. 3-9, 2012

Never send your rare quasi-illegal coins to be verified by the government. Seriously stolen property should never be sent back to the people it was stolen from for verification. That is like in a bad neighborhood when someone robs you then their kid comes around and tries to sell you back your own stuff.

A judge agrees that 10 gold 1933 $20 coins, possibly worth $80 million, belongs to the government and not the people who found them.

Coin-flipping season began Wednesday, also known as football season. The outcome of these coin flips are bound to cause disputes especially with high school refs in charge. 

While researching my 10 Ruble Bill I found a cool Russian money website.

India's coin shortage is getting odd with candy as change and a huge increase of fees for small businesses to get coins. I can see a Skittles commercial in the future.

2 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

Dr. Math said...

I think the Double Eagle story is a bit ridiculous. Stuff like that annoys me because I can see both sides of the story and while one is more right morally the other is more right legally. Then again the law may not matter much considering it is perfectly legal to beat your wife on the courthouse steps on Sunday in SC. http://www.dumblaws.com/laws/united-states/south-carolina?page=0

Man said...

Stuff like that annoys me because I can see both sides of the story

But there aren't 2 sides just 1. Stolen items should always be returned, morally and legally.

Before I started banking coins I had some stolen from my home. I do not care if the thief died and his/her child then takes and try to sell them it is still my property. I will always want them recovered to me or my future generations.

Also I never use the south as a moral authority seeing how after slavery ended they found loopholes keeping many in servitude until the 1920s.