Monday, December 05, 2011

1990 Cayman Islands Quarter (DDO?)

Do you have a Cayman Islands coin and want to know its value? Leave a comment

One of six Cayman Islands coin I have and for the first time I noticed it has some doubling actually it is tripling. Looking at the word CAYMAN and the 1990 just with your eye it looks blurry. A closer look there is some doubling.

This picture was as clear as I could get as the camera was showing the shaky camera symbol. My poor Canon G11 could not auto-focus on half of the coin.

Check out this close up on the A you see clear flat machine doubling. Oh but the next picture it gets better.

Check out the 199 and  you see tripling. But the tripling is like steps each layer is flat and slightly lower then the one before that is clearly machine doubling and not true doubling. Even the rim has some doubling and at the point the rim is spilting is where the design is also affected. 

Anywhere the rim is normal so is the design. This is because the die hit the coin and then jumped on the coin a second and third time as the coin shifted slightly.

Back of the coin is normal.

So at the end this coin has no extra value. It is not an error but it is very cool to notice after years in my collection.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 25 Cents / Cayman Islands
Year: 1990
Mintage: Not yet known.
Metal: Copper-Nickel
Value: $0.25 in Fine (although the tripling may change that for some)

Side note: This should be a Cambodian post but I cannot find it. All I have is a notebook scribble that says Cambodia 1979 with no other reference, whether it was a coin or note it is gone, for now.

Do you have a quarter from the Cayman Islands and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

5 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

Kelly said...

What's the difference between machine doubling and true doubling?

Man said...

What's the difference between machine doubling and true doubling?

machine doubling - when the coin is struck it gets hit twice or more at a very minor shift.
Like if you drop a hammer it may still bounce very lightly.
The result is a flat second image on the coin.

true doubling - the die used to press the coin was made with a doubled image, then every coin pressed will have the double image.
The die with mistakes should be noticed and destroyed but since doubling is so tiny it is occasionally missed.
The result is a rounder second image that is not flat.

Phil Leone said...

I have one of these cayman 25 cent coins.
It looks exactly like these photos which means if there was machine doubling it happened when the die was made.
I love the error coins and have had and still have several!
I have found many scarce ones and found one not registered anywhere before!
The Cherrypickers guide explains the different types of doubling very well!
I have the fourth edition volume 1.

Man said...

I have one of these cayman 25 cent coins.
It looks exactly like these photos which means if there was machine doubling it happened when the die was made.


Yeah, this is most likely Die Deterioration error and not true doubling.

Kekedon said...

How much a cayman islands 25 cent cost in Jamaica now