Thursday, August 09, 2012

1943-P Wartime Silver Nickel

Have any nickel and want to know its value? Leave a comment

Wartime nickels were made from 1942-1945 out of silver, copper, and manganese. The reason for the lack of nickel in these coins was that it was needed for armor during World War II. The silver alloy mix tends to tarnish fast since it is 35% silver. Also many having peeling or lamination error since the mix and pressure used was not perfected.



Found yesterday in my change from some local supermarket this is the third 1943-P nickel I found in my change. After receiving change I put all the unsearched change in my right pocket and the searched change in my left. After getting home I just took a quick glance at the small change I had and instantly noticed this nickel's color and huge P over Monticello.

That huge P mint mark was added this way the public knew that coin contained no nickel. It is also an easy way for the government to recycle the old nickel coins. Now the huge mint mark is an instant way to see you found a silver nickel.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 5 Cents / United States of America
Year: 1943-P
Mintage: 271,165,000
Metal: 56% copper, 35% silver, and 9% manganese
Value: G-4 $1.58

Do you have any nickel and want to know its value? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

12 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

Dr. Math said...

I found a 1941-S wide S nickel the other day. At first I thought it was a 1944 wartime nickel, but a quick check of the date and dome revealed it was a 1941. At least I now have both varieties of 1941-S nickels. Anyway what are these: http://img13.imageshack.us/slideshow/webplayer.php?id=cfe001w.jpg worth?

Man said...

1980 British 2 Pence about $0.05
2007 France 2 Euro Cents about $0.05
2008-F Germany 2 Euro cents about $0.05
1985 France 5 Centimes about $0.05
1998 Mexico about $0.15
1998 Peru 5 Centimos about $0.35
1995 Philippines 5 Sentimos about $0.15
2002 British 5 Pence about $0.10
2005-G Germany 5 Euro Cents about $0.10
2002 Barbados 5 Cents about $0.05
1989 Brazil 5 Centavos about $0.25
2004 Egypt 5 Piastres about $0.75
1976 Tanzania 5 Senti about $0.05
1993 Netherlands 5 Cents about $0.10

Kelly said...

I love the old nickels...they always stand out to me. Something about how sharp the lettering still is after all of these years...

Man said...

I love the old nickels...they always stand out to me. Something about how sharp the lettering still is after all of these years...

Yes, the large details stayed but the small details like window and steps never were that sharp.

They changed how pressure was applied and now the small details are sharp but the overall large details are weaker.

eyeseeyu said...

I have a 1884 us nickel, just wanted to know if the edge of the coin(collar?) is supposed to look like this. Are there supposed to ridges all around and not just partial? Looks like it was off a bit when stamped. Also, your opinion/stats about this nickel. Here's the link to the pic of the nickel: http://www.flickr.com/photos/90505359@N00/7757309932/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/90505359@N00/7757309842/
Thanks!

Man said...

1884 us nickel, just wanted to know if the edge of the coin(collar?) is supposed to look like this.

Everything is normal.

Coin looks extra-fine so about $85.00. The bottom is a bit blurry so I cannot be positive about grade.

eyeseeyu said...

All the way to the edge (on the bottom) of the obverse side is all ridges, where as the top has some smooth edge with ridges below it. Same goes for the reverse side. Hope that helps. I've searched online and in a coin book for reference pics and didn't see any that looked like this. Just thought maybe it was an error strike of some sort.
Nice to know what it's worth, I got it for 5¢ from work in an opened roll of nickels =D !

Man said...

All the way to the edge (on the bottom) of the obverse side is all ridges, where as the top has some smooth edge with ridges below it.

Very minor Off-Center error, but that is common and it adds no extra value.

Michelle Hardin said...

I am new to coin collecting so please excuse my lack of lingo knowledge:) Yesterday I was given a 1941 S nickel that seems different. On the obverse on reverse you can see the outline of what seems to be another coin. Its more obvious on the reverse. You can also see a light date and a few letters. My guess is its a penny. From the investigating ive done the strike through planchet error seems to fit but im not sure. The coin is circulated but in very good condition because its been in a box for 50 years. If i could please get some help on what this is, it would be very much appreciated. Thank you!

Man said...

On the obverse on reverse you can see the outline of what seems to be another coin. Its more obvious on the reverse. You can also see a light date and a few letters. My guess is its a penny.

Not possible. A strike through is when some object is struck on th coin.

What you have sounds like a Die Clash error. When the die is stamped without any coin and retains images of the other side of the coin.

This has no extra value.

In case it is something else place good pictures online then link them here.

benita smith said...

what is the meaning of the (p) on top of the coin got a 1943 coin and what is the value of the coin

Man said...

what is the meaning of the (p) on top of the coin got a 1943 coin and what is the value of the coin

Assuming the coin is a nickel.
The P was meant to show that the coin was temporarily being made of a different metal. In this case 35% silver and other metals.
It also stands for Philadelphia were it was minted.

About $1.00 in circulated condition.