Friday, November 25, 2011

Black Friday Finds

Not talking about something on sale. I am talking about a good opportunity over the next few weeks to find odd and possibly value coins and currency in your change. No need to roll hunt at your bank or buy coins lots from dealers. This is way more simple.

How to get change finds:
1. Use cash
--This is great because there is no interest on credit cards and you get the actually change.

2. Make friends while checking out
--Cashiers and others shoppers have odd money and being kind will go far. Foreigners may need help making change and you can help. Most tourists are happy to sell or give small change they consider common.

3. Recognize damage vs. error
--This is damaged...
Coins are tough but it takes very little pressure, heat, or chemical (ie. water, salt) to alter them dramatically. The coin pictured above looks like someone tried to cut it with wire or bolt cutters. The reason why is not important but it is not an error. If you know the basic minting process then this cannot happen at any minting stage and there for has no extra value.

Still if your not sure put it aside and take good pictures.

4. Bring extra money for trade
--Anytime you go shopping you should bring 2-5 of the most common coins. Here in the U.S. carry 5 pennies, 5 nickels, 5 dimes, 5 quarters, and 5 dollar bills for trade. Use them to swap out old coins in pick-a-penny tray or to give to the cashier if you find out they have a few old notes. If 5 is too many then cut it down to what you feel comfortable carrying.

5. Keep a sharp eye out
--Opportunities for finds are everywhere. Look on the ground, look on the counters, check other people's change, and especially your own change.

6. Know what is common for your change versus rare
--Although you hardly see $2 bills in the U.S. most are common so unless you really want them just pass it on. Do a little research on when silver coins were last made or if replacement notes look different or even if certain years carry more errors.

Good luck and yes the turkey was delicious. 


12 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

Dr. Math said...

What is a Cuban 5 centavos 1999 in fine condition worth?

Dr. Math said...

Also did your cent from your "Damage Exposes Layers" post survive?

Man said...

Cuban 5 centavos 1999 in fine condition
--About $0.10

did your cent from your "Damage Exposes Layers" post survive?
--Last I checked it is the same but where I keep my coins is very dark and dry. I even use those silica packets to stabilize the humidity.

Dr. Math said...

Cool. I read the post and thought it was very interesting. I think it is weird that there are so many damaged cents in my change and everyone's change I suppose... Then again they have very little value so I guess people don't really care.

Dr. Math said...

What is a 1950-F 10 Pfennig in fine condition worth?

Man said...

1950-F 10 Pfennig in fine condition about $0.10

Tyler Lawrence said...

Good post! I always bring extra change with me and it is worth it. I always trade so I get wheat pennies and old nickels.

baselle said...

All great advice and it is an extra incentive to shop cash businesses in your local area. Many of the local cashiers will now save wheaties for us.

cet4494 said...

what is a poor condition $10 bill from 1950 worth?

Man said...

poor condition $10 bill from 1950 just $10.00 depending on serial number

cet4494 said...

any paticular sn, or fed district?

Man said...

any paticular sn, or fed district?

Any star note, all others have no extra value in poor.