Tuesday, June 09, 2009

2009 Native American Dollar

Do you have a dollar coin and want to know how much it's worth? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

Dollar coins are easy enough to come by when using the Metrocard vending machines but to avoid the bulky change and possible empty return slots I just use exact change on all vending machines. So when I got this dollar coin in regular change I was shocked in several ways.

First the coin was a 2009 Native American design, second it was being circulated, and third I got the correct change.

Starting from the reintroduction of the dollar coin in 1999:
1999 saw the Susan B. Anthony, I found a 1999-P.
2000-2008 saw the regular Sacagewea, I found a 2000-P and 2001-P.
2007-2016 will see the Presidential series, I found a 1st, 3rd, 5th, & 6th all P.
2009-???? will see a new Native American design each year, I found 2009-P.

So out of the 42 dollar coin that were released for circulation ( yes I'm including certain Sac dollars that were not officially released but sold through direct shipping programs) from both mints I have found 8. Granted for a while I kept finding 2000 & 2001 dollars by the handful. Today they are rare and too ugly to keep. I'm left wondering is a 19% (8/42) finding rate a good or bad sign. Imagine adding the varieties and uncirculated types.

They switched the date to the edge along with the E PLURIBUS UNUM and 13 stars.

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 1 Dollar-Native American / United States
Year: 2009 P (Edge normal)
Mintage: 37,800,000 (Estimated)
Metal: 88.5% Copper, 6% Zinc, 3.5% Manganese, and 2% Nickel
Value: $1.00 in F-12

The Law
20% of all dollar coins must be the Native American design for all years that the presidential coins are made. Each Native American dollar must feature an aspect of Native American culture.

This one is Agriculture. Specifically the Three Sisters way of planting also known as companion planting. Pictured is a native farmer planting her beans in the same mound as corn and squash. The corn grows in poor soil and then the squash grows underneath providing shade and weed protection. The beans then grow around the corn stalks as a vine returning nitrogen to the soil. This relationship is so successful you can grow more and healthy crops.

Do you have a dollar coin and want to know how much it's worth? Leave a comment/question and I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

8 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

James UK said...

I like your new text at the top of the blog, by the way.

"The Law
20% of all dollar coins must be the Native American design for all years that the presidential coin are made. Each Native American dollar must feature an aspect of Native American culture."

I never knew that! I learnt something today! Thanks!

Man said...

I like your new text at the top of the blog, by the way.

What new text?
I haven't changed anything in a while I'm trying to make a new template from scratch but it's going bad.

For each new coin there is a new law. The Presidential coins laws and Parks quarters laws are just laughable.

James UK said...

Oh, I thouht that bit "To know the value, prices and worth of everyday money. Pennies, nickels, quarters, dimes from every place and every time. For Out-Of-Pocket collectors." was new. Perhaps I've only just noticed it.

Man said...

It has always been there. I kept the font and color as light as possible it may have changed while I've been messing with the code last week.

This HTML and XHTML is difficult.

Alex said...

Man, I have to say thank you for your wishes of good luck and safety.

I wish you the best as well.

Kelly said...

Interesting bit, I didn't know that law...it makes sense, though. It is an ugly coin, though. Particularly the font on the back. It reminds me of casino lettering, or something.

Now, I have a question for you...but it isn't regarding a dollar coin. I ran across a 1940 quarter, that I had stashed away. Not sure if I found it, or what. Any idea of what kind of value it would hold? It is in poor condition, edges are rounded and almost smoothed out.

Also, I remember you mentioning a while ago that coins with holes are of no value, but I have a dime that I bought (because I like coins with holes) for a dollar or so...*runs to look* and it, too, is a 1940. Any idea of the value of this one (if it didn't have the hole, of course).

Just wondering, too, about the rarity of these coins.

Oh, and I think you mentioned that coins before 1965 are higher in value due to their silver content (if I am remembering correctly)...I ran across a 1964 nickel...is it anything special?

Kelly said...

Oh, I forgot to add, the dime has a D on the back. Also, why the W (I'm assuming it is a 'W') on the front...what is the significance?

Man said...

1940 quarter...poor condition, edges are rounded and almost smoothed out.
About $3.00 if it had a mintmark it would on the reverse below the twigs. D or S is worth more than blank.

coins with holes ... is a 1940-D.
Just for the silver content about a $1.00 or less.

...about the rarity of these coins.
Neither are rare but if the quarter were a 1940-D it would be rare and in that condition still fetch $12.00.

coins before 1965 are higher in value due to their silver content
Yes mostly the dimes, quarters, halves, and dollars because of the silver.

Nickels only from 1942-1945 have silver, 1950-D is rare even though not silver.
1964 nickel has no extra value.

...dime has a D on the back. Also, why the W (I'm assuming it is a 'W') on the front...what is the significance?
It is the designer's initials A over W. Which stands for Adolph Weinman.