Tuesday, March 15, 2011

1991 Canada Cent

Do you have a Canadian cent and want to know its value? Leave a comment

Three months into 2011 and I have yet to find any foreign coins. Of course plenty of Canadians but nothing from a country that is more than a bus ride away. This is odd since one third of my finds are foreign coins.

Possible lack of coins from far off lands....
  • Continuing economic troubles
  • Snowy winter made NY travel tough
  • Devaluation of the dollar
  • Metal hoarders
  • More access to the web
The last item on the list is interesting if you think about it. Twenty years ago if you found a Morocco Dirham you may look at it and think you lost out on American money. Maybe you would hold on to it and a few months later check the internet. Soon you would notice how this coin is just fraction of the value its U.S. counter part. Maybe you already thought this and just threw it back into circulation.

Today you get it and whip out that smartphone and get currency values, eBay values, and blogger/forum opinions. You then notice that everything has some value and choose to put it aside hoping to become rich in the near future. This coupled with the other things on the above list distorts the reality of the coin market.

The problem is that finding a $3.00 coin does not mean you have pizza money in your pocket. Selling, shipping, and fees makes only the most skilled able to turn a profit. That truth falls aside as more people looking to get rich quick and hoard coins.

Back to my find...

Here's the stats...
Type/Country: 1 Cent / Canada
Year: 1991
Mintage: 831,010,000
Metal: 98% Copper, 0.5% Tin, 1.5% Zinc
Value: $0.02

Do you have a cent from Canada and want to know their value? Leave a comment/question an I will do my best to find out the price and history for you.

28 dollars worth, for Comments/Questions click here.:

Obsolete Currency said...

At least you can legally melt the Canadian copper pennies for the copper.

Man said...

At least you can legally melt the Canadian copper pennies for the copper.

I've been trying to get access to at the local college to try this but there are rules and insurance problems. I just want to make a copper bar.

Silver MLM said...

Canada can be considered a true treasure trove for rare and special coins. That is why collectors are advised not to overlook the many wonderful coins produced by Canada. They are simply too unique and valuable to be ignored!

Man said...

Ok

Anonymous said...

the 10 franc coins mentioned previously are 1979 & 1980

Man said...

10 franc coins are very dense. what is it's metal content?...10 franc coins mentioned previously are 1979 & 1980


Nickel-Brass mixture.
Sorry but I do not know the exact percentage.

Anonymous said...

A 1918 Canadian penny in good condition?

Man said...

1918 Canadian penny in good condition about $0.30

Anonymous said...

Found a two(2) headed canadian 1 cent. Heads are from same era (1910-1936?). No year on coin; I'm sure you understand why. I read up a bit on trick coins and counterfeits. It's probably a hand made joke coin -- but Very Well Crafted as far as I'm concerned. Is it possible I have a true error and not a joke coin? I saw what is probably a seam consistent with machine work after production... but what stats or knowledge can you lend to tell me otherwise.

Man said...

two(2) headed canadian 1 cent. Heads are from same era (1910-1936?). No year on coin; I'm sure you understand why. I read up a bit on trick coins and counterfeits. It's probably a hand made joke coin -- but Very Well Crafted as far as I'm concerned. Is it possible I have a true error and not a joke coin?

There have been 2 "Two-tailed" Canadian cents both from 1980.
The way Canada makes coins it is impossible for two-headed coins. That said having different designs would be even more impossible.

I think it is a well made magic coin that has been worn clean of tamper marks over the years.

Under high magnification along with a a slight twisting motion you may see the seam.

Here is a good magazine showing other two-headed coins...you'll see they are obvious when they are genuine errors.
http://minterrornews.com/issue6.pdf

Anonymous said...

Hi, found a 1964 Canadian cent in au condition. The hair braids are still clearly visible to give you a better idea of condition. Any value to it? Thanks.

Anonymous said...

woops, i meant the hair lines are clearly visible. Thanks.

Man said...

1964 Canadian cent in au condition about $0.07

Anonymous said...

i have a 5 cent 1936 canadian coin in fairly good nick with a few scratches on king georges face. and a 1943 (steel) american penny in extremely good condition with loads and loads of lustre (almost full lustre) and only a dent or 2 on lincolns face . as well i have a 1944 american quarter which is falling apart beacause it was dumped in water or something and a standing liberty quarter from 1929 that i had to get a magnifying glass to see the date its so worn it has an "M"on the side which is too clear oto be a mintmark i"d say.

Man said...

5 cent 1936 canadian coin in fairly good nick with a few scratches on king georges face
--About $0.35

1943 (steel) american penny in extremely good condition with loads and loads of lustre (almost full lustre) and only a dent or 2 on lincolns face
--About $0.50

1944 american quarter which is falling apart
--About $6.05

standing liberty quarter from 1929 that i had to get a magnifying glass to see the date its so worn it has an "M"on the side which is too clear oto be a mintmark
--About $6.05 the mintmark is above and slightly to the left of the 1 in the date.
The M is not the mintmark but the designers initial.

Dafna said...

Hi
My question is not about coins value is about the legality of using them in art?.
Can Canadian coins be used for art (covered with epoxy, where one side not showing at all? couldnt find anywhere any details.... if you know that will help...
so far for me they are the cheapest art supply i can get....
thnx

Man said...

My question is not about coins value is about the legality of using them in art?.
Can Canadian coins be used for art (covered with epoxy, where one side not showing at all? couldnt find anywhere any details.... if you know that will help...
so far for me they are the cheapest art supply i can get....


Well I can speak for my country USA but if your in Canada it should be the same.
Yes, as long as you are not advertising for profit or trying to pass off a coin as another denomination for business.

So all foreign and domestic coins are free to use in art. You can drill them, paint them, plate them or smash them into bits and it is legally. Even selling them as art is fine as long as you are trying to use them at the store.

Here is one art piece I saw at a local museum: Coin basket

Dafna said...

thnx a million....

Grace :) said...

Hi! I have a 1954 Canadian nickel, great condition. I also have a 1751-1951 Nickel, Also in great condition. Can i have some value prices in CAD? Thanks a bunch! <3

Man said...

1954 Canadian nickel, great condition
--About $0.50

1751-1951 Nickel, Also in great condition.
--About $0.40

Anonymous said...

I have a Canadian 1 cent just like the one you found except it's 1999. Just curious how much it's worth.

Man said...

Canadian 1 cent just like the one you found except it's 1999

Just $0.01

Anonymous said...

A 1966 1 cent Pfennig

Man said...

Assuming German Fed. Rep.

1966 1 cent Pfennig about $0.05

Anonymous said...

A 2006 BAHK POCCNN 5 KOIIEEK

Man said...

2006 BAHK POCCNN 5 KOIIEEK

2006 Russian 5 Kopeks about $0.05

Anonymous said...

1991 Canadian Nickel, AU-55 to MS60....

Man said...

1991 Canadian Nickel,
AU-55 about $0.15
MS60 about $0.75